Shop More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
August 18, 2012
Image Size
181 KB
Resolution
1202×902
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Mature Content
Yes
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
3,016
Favourites
76 (who?)
Comments
13
Downloads
105
×
Mature Content Filter is On
(Contains: nudity)


Usual disclaimer: These are my opinions! There is no real physical centaur to compare against, so the best I can do is make an educated guess. If you prefer a design other than this, that's fine, but this is what I'm going to keep drawing. If you disagree, fine, but do so politely, and above all, please don't ask I draw things your way. I know how I think it'd work, and that ain't gonna change.


Drawing a horse is difficult. Drawing a human is difficult. Taking two of the most difficult things in the universe to draw and gluing them together is simply madness. And the result of that madness is that a lot of people fail pretty hard on drawing either one half or the other, most often because they get the horse's joints wrong.

So this is a simple diagram to help get the joints more correct. Next time, we'll look at the bones that make all this work, but for now, let's go simple.

The Foreleg

The foreleg has three critical joints in it: The elbow, the knee, and the fetlock (foreankle). The elbow can bend between straight and about 60 forward. The knee is very flexible, and can bend from straight to backward quite a ways. And the fetlock bends from about 30 forward to about 30 backward. There is also a joint at the shoulder, but it tends not to move much except during leaping and galloping, so you can consider it to be relatively stable.

To think about the foreleg correctly, you should compare it to a human arm: The upper two blue parts are equivalent to the upper arm and forearm, and everything below the equine knee is actually a "hand," with the pastern-and-hoof being equivalent to fingers. So if you think about it this way, the equine elbow is just like a human elbow, and it only bends forward, but is pretty flexible; and the knee is like a wrist, but only really bends backward, but can bend backward farther than your wrist can.

The Hind Leg

The hind leg also has three critical joints in it: The stifle, the hock, and the (hind) ankle. The stifle is very flexible, and bends from straight to quite a ways backward. The hock is less flexible, and bends forward from almost straight to almost horizontal. And the (hind) ankle, just like the fetlock (foreankle), bends from about 30 forward to about 30 backward. There is also a hip joint, but it is fairly stable and does not move much except during leaping and galloping.

To think about the hind leg correctly, you should compare it to a human leg: The upper two blue parts are equivalent to your thigh and calf, respectively, and the pastern-and-hoof are equivalent to your foot and toes. So if you think about it this way, the critical part to remember is how high up the knee actually is, just below the barrel, and how high up the "human ankle" actually is, halfway up the visible part of the leg.

In Short

A horse walks on just the very tips of its "fingers" and "toes," and a centaur does the same. Half of what you see of each leg is equivalent to a human "hand" or "foot," and should bend just like hands and feet do; and most of the actual "leg" is shorter and higher up.

_____________________________________________


Next time, we'll look at the actual bones that make up the arms and legs so you can see how all this fits together.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconckentavr:
CKentavr Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012
The forehips would be floating joints, though, so the centaur could lean through 100+ motion tho, right?
Reply
:iconphantom-inker:
phantom-inker Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
They're not part of a pelvic bone; I call them "hips" just because they look a little like hips, but they aren't really. The upper torso is connected to the lower torso purely by a very flexible part of the spinal column and lots of muscle. So a centaur can in my designs lean the torso about 60 back and about 120 forward from vertical, for a total range of motion of about 180 forward-to-back (although relatively little side-to-side). I've debated putting a ball joint at the crux of the two spinal columns, but it never looks all that appropriate, so I've instead just spaced out the vertebrae and assumed there's a lot of muscle and cartilage filling the spaces.
Reply
:iconckentavr:
CKentavr Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2012
Right, that's what I meant.
Reply
:iconlittlebluemonster:
LittleBlueMonster Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012
A lot of well-done reflections!
My observations are: if the horse starts trot or gallop, may be you will need a 5th joint at it's hoof. Horse weight press the leg down making often the little noise "crac", the hoof looks like a zigzag and become springy.
Sorry about my English...
Reply
:iconphantom-inker:
phantom-inker Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The primary purpose of this was as an artist's beginning primer so as to avoid the worst mistakes in leg structure. So I dumbed it down as much as I could to just a handful of basic joints. For those purposes, that tiny extra joint, or the fact that the shoulder really can rotate, isn't really relevant. I'll be happy enough if artists actually start drawing equines where the legs don't bend the wrong way.
Reply
:iconjkrolak:
jkrolak Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
You may want to include the one additional limb that a centaur has that a human does not, the tail.
Reply
:iconphantom-inker:
phantom-inker Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The primary purpose of this was as an artist's beginning primer so as to avoid the worst mistakes in leg structure. So I dumbed it down as much as I could to just a handful of basic joints. For those purposes, the tail isn't really relevant.
Reply
:iconkaze-youko:
Kaze-Youko Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2012
Thanks a bunch for doing this series. =D
Reply
:iconphantom-inker:
phantom-inker Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Very welcome! There's more to come!
Reply
:iconworld-of-zekira:
world-of-zekira Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2012
This is *excellent* information :D
Reply
Add a Comment: